Kenosha Radiology Center

Your health, your choice                                                       (262) 697-7770

We offer a variety of diagnostic and interventional procedures

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)


       An MRI is a study that allows us to see inside the body by using a powerful magnetic field and radiowaves. If you are coming in for an MRI, here's what you should know:


  • The procedure is painless. 
  • The exam can take anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour. 
  • Exams done in the 3T magnet take considerably less time and produce higher quality images. However, for patients who may not fit well in the 3T magnet or who have severe claustrophobia, our high quality open MRI magnet is a good option.
  • Patients with certain types of implanted devices, such as pacemakers, are not eligible for MRI.   
  • You can bring your own music in the form of a CD to listen to while you have your exam. Otherwise, we have a selection of music to choose from. 
  • For an MRI of the abdomen, you should not eat 4 hours before. For all other MRIs, you may eat and take medication as you normally would. 
  • Because the scanner is a magnet, an MRI requires that you remove all metal from your body, including jewelry, watches, hair pins, nonpermanent dentures, glasses and hearing aids. We suggest leaving jewelry at home but if you forget, you may leave it in a safe place. 
  • Sometimes, MRI exams require IV contrast injection with gadolinium, an extremely safe substance. Don't worry- our experienced technologists will make sure you don't feel a thing.

Computed Tomography (CT)


A CT is a tool that uses very thin X-ray beams to look inside your body. If you are coming in for a CT scan, here's what you should know:


  • The procedure is painless
  • A single scan takes between several seconds and a minute, depending on how much of your body is being scanned
  • For some exams, CT requires IV contrast injection with a safe iodine-containing substance. For other exams, patients may be required to drink a barium contrast solution. 
  • Some patients may not be able to eat before their exam- our staff will let you know when you schedule your scan.

Ultrasound


An ultrasound is a technique that permits us to look inside your body using a high frequency sound beam. If you are coming in for an ultrasound, here's what you should know:


  • The procedure is painless and safe for everyone
  • We will put some gel on your skin to improve transmission of the sound
  • Depending on what body part is being scanned, you may not be able to eat before your exam; our staff will let you know when you schedule your scan.

X-ray


An x-ray uses a very low dose of ionizing radiation to take a picture of the inside of the body. If you are coming in for an x-ray, here's what you should know:


  • The procedure is painless
  • The amount of radiation received during an x-ray is minimal. For more information about radiation, visit our FAQ page.
  • Patients having an X-ray should eat and take medication as usual
  • The exam typically takes less than 10 minutes

Fluoroscopy 


Fluoroscopy is a technique that uses x-rays to watch the body's physiology. If you are coming in for fluoroscopy, here's what you should know:


  • The procedure is painless
  • The amount of radiation received during fluoroscopy is minimal. For more information about radiation, visit our FAQ page.
  • Patients undergoing gastrointestinal fluoroscopy studies, such as upper GI or barium swallow, need to fast beginning at midnight the night before the procedure. Our staff will discuss this with you when you schedule your exam

Mammography


A mammogram is an x-ray that uses a special technique to screen for breast cancer. The current recommendations for breast cancer screening in women with average risk are a baseline mammogram between ages 35 and 40 and annual mammograms beginning at age 40. For women whose mother or sisters have had pre-menopausal breast cancer, special screening guidelines may apply. If you are coming in for a mammogram, here's what you should know:


  • All mammograms are performed by trained female mammographers 
  • Compression is necessary in order to obtain a clear picture of the breast. Some women may feel minor discomfort from compression; however, this only lasts a brief moment and is essential for screening.
  • We provide nearly all mammography patients with their mammography results before they leave their appointment. If further evaluation is needed, such as special mammographic views, ultrasound, or breast biopsy, we try to do that right away in the same visit. 

Nuclear Medicine


Nuclear medicine uses very small doses of radioactive materials to take images of the body. Nuclear medicine can help us see things that may not be seen in other scans. If you are coming in for nuclear medicine, here's what you should know:


  • The procedure is painless
  • Nuclear medicine patients are injected with a small amount of a radioactive tracer. After injection, the scan may take place anywhere from immediately to 48 hours afterwards. Our staff will let you know when you schedule your exam


Bone Densitometry 


Bone density scans are used to test for osteoporosis or low bone mineral density. By detecting low bone mineral density early, it is possible to prevent osteoporosis. If osteoporosis is detected in a scan, a patient can be treated and monitored. If you are coming in for a bone density scan, here's what you should know:


  • Take no vitamins or calcium supplements for 48 hours prior to the scan.
  • The procedure is painless
  • If you prefer not to change into a gown, you may wear sweatpants with no metal pieces

Interventional Procedures


The radiologists at KRC provide a variety of interventional procedures, including epidural steroid injections, injections of all joints for treatment or diagnosis, organ biopsies, and same-day breast biopsies. If you are coming in for a biopsy or injection, here's what you should know:


  • The patient's comfort is very important to us; all procedures are done with the smallest needle possible and with local anesthetic, not infrequently resulting in a painless procedure
  • Typically, it is best not to eat immediately before the procedure. Our staff will let you know when you schedule your exam.